HD Talks

Wine Design

Posted by on September 2, 2015 in Projects, Sustainability

I’ll admit that I was initially drawn to the subject of this post as a wine drinker originally from Portland, Oregon. When I saw the news that one of my favorite wineries had debuted it’s new Tasting House, I was excited—even from all the way across the country in New York. It also seemed appropriate as a teaser for our almost-out September issue, where we delve into our industry’s reach into other areas—from retail to sports arenas to tiny houses (and wineries).

Argyle Winery’s historic barrel room and cellar has been converted into a new Tasting House and hospitality center designed by SERA Architecture. Photo by Andrea Johnson Photography.

Argyle Winery’s historic barrel room and cellar has been converted into a new Tasting House and hospitality center designed by SERA Architects. Photo by Andrea Johnson Photography.

Dundee, Oregon’s Argyle Winery, founded in 1987 and famed for its delicious sparkling wines, recently opened the Tasting House—an extension of its former winery (it has moved manufacturing elsewhere) and current tasting room, which is housed in an old Victorian House—partnering with Portland firm SERA Architects. It seemed a perfect match, says principal Lisa Zangerle, as the project and winery’s ethos is in line with the firm’s approach of “sustainability, recycle, reuse,” she points out. The team even discovered the wood (Douglas fir) and steel used for the Tasting House onsite. “The character of the wood was gorgeous,” Zangerle explains, so the team had it recut and sanded to make new paneling, shelving, tables, and the bar.

The new space includes a retail component enclosed by sliding walls that are former riddling racks (made with holes set at angles to facilitate the periodic turning of sparkling wines as part of the fermentation process), while an onsite wine library with space to house 4,000 bottles showcases vintages all the way back to the winery’s founding. “We wanted it to be open and comfortable,” Zangerle says, referencing the recycled concrete floors and variety of seating areas in line with Argyle’s approachable, yet sophisticated style. Seating in front of the bar is accented by carpet tiles in a white, gray, and black pattern, while the color palette through the rest of the space—cream, charcoal, and dark brown hues—is drawn from the Argyle label.

Design and architectural features were made using repurposed materials from the original cellar on site, including metal beams and lumber found during deconstruction of the old winery. Photo by Andrea Johnson Photography.

Design and architectural features were made using repurposed materials from the original cellar on site, including metal beams and lumber found during deconstruction of the old winery. Photo by Andrea Johnson Photography.

The indoor area can open up via sliding glass doors to a landscaped, outdoor concrete patio complete with benches repurposed from the winery’s former crush pad area. “The client wanted to consider the 21st century but recognize the roots of Argyle and where they came from, without being overly pretentious,” Zangerle explains.

I’ll be making a trip to my nearby wine shop in Brooklyn (which thankfully carries Argyle) to cheers to that.

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